From The Digital Baul, Part 1: Vakul Weaving

My computer has been rather rudely reminding me that I need to do some maintenance and clean up; it’s been freezing up and refusing to budge if I have more than a few sites and apps open, so I’ve been digging through my digital baul* weeding out old files that I no longer need. I found a stash of photos from way back when Multiply was still a thing (remember them?), and I’m thinking of uploading them here to back them up. I’ll have to get permission from some of the people in the shots, though, so it’s going to take a while.

For now, I’ll leave you with this collection of vakul weaving photos, still from the Batanes collection. The vakul is a traditional headdress that the Ivatan people wear to work in the fields. The vakul is sturdy enough to keep them dry during the rainy season, and comfortable enough to keep them cool in the summer. It takes the weavers up to a week to make a single vakul, depending on its size.

*Baul is the Filipino word for a chest in which to keep one’s things.

Vakul Weavers, Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Vakul Weavers, Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes. It takes the weavers an entire week to create a vakul, a traditional Ivatan headdress meant to protect the wearer from the elements.

Detail, Vakul weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Detail, Vakul weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Vakul Weaver. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Vakul Weaver. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Vakul Weaver. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Vakul Weaver. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Detail, Vakul weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Detail, Vakul Weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes. The weavers use their feet to keep the vakul stable as it grows longer.

Detail, Vakul Weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Detail, Vakul Weaving. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes. The weavers rub two strands of string on their thighs to combine them and make them stronger. It’s painful and painstaking work akin to waxing the same spot on your thigh over and over again. Every. Single. Day.

Unfinished Vakul. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Unfinished Vakul. Chavayan, Sabtang Island, Batanes.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “From The Digital Baul, Part 1: Vakul Weaving

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s